Tag Archives: press

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BCRA: The Anti-Healthcare Bill

Audio Podcast (192kbps MP3 download)
(video at bottom of text)

Hello and welcome back to the ericvalor.org Blogcast Podcast.

My name is Eric Valor and I will be your host for this episode. Please make yourselves comfortable and feel free to order something from the bar.

As my longtime readers know, this is not a political blogcast. The scope of this blogcast is limited to the subject of ALS, living with the disease, research into treatments for ALS, experiences of Person(s) with ALS (PALS), and my personal reflections. I routinely deny requests to “guest blog” general health subjects (also because they are just attempts to spread spam links). But I have to address a subject which affects 17% of our entire economy and the daily lives of 99% of our citizens, and has devastating implications for PALS and others similarly affected by severe conditions. That subject is the long-awaited Republican response to the Patient Affordable Healthcare Act, also known as the Affordable Care Act or more colloquially Obamacare.

On Thursday, June 23rd, 2017, the Republican Senate Majority Leader released a “discussion draft” of their supposedly “better” healthcare plan which was promised to lower medical costs and improve medical care for American citizens, and “rescue” us all from the “disaster” of Obamacare. Just like the ridiculous House bill (which Paul Ryan apparently hurriedly cobbled together over a long weekend), the Senate Better Care Reconciliation Act snatches access to healthcare from, and makes it much more expensive for, tens of millions of Americans. We waited 7 years for this? I call it the anti-healthcare bill.

Republicans incessantly whined for 7 years about how terrible Obamacare was, how they had “a much better plan”, how the ACA was “passed in secret with no hearings, input from Republicans or the public, and was written behind closed doors. Actually it was available online for a year for public comment, had over 100 hearings, and included over 100 Republican amendments. After all that time this embarrassment on paper is the best they can come up with? This naked frontal assault on the poor and middle-class WILL LITERALLY KILL ME and others with ALS and other deadly conditions – all to give around $1 TRILLION to the already-hyper-wealthy. Moreover, it was literally written in complete secrecy behind closed doors (in such secrecy that one of the supposed authors of the bill never saw it until today) and will have no hearings with less than 10 hours of debate and amendments before a vote is called about a week from now. Undoubtedly Senator Tortoise McGee wants to rush this vote before senators go on recess and get an earful from constituents.

Article on the BCRA from The Guardian

Obamacare is NOT “failing” (as Republicans ludicrously tried to proclaim even before ACA went into effect). The reality of the situation is that tens of millions more Americans have access to affordable healthcare. Medical bills are the number 1 cause of bankruptcy in America. And that comes from a lack of insurance.

The ACA is only “failing” in those states which intentionally refused to cooperate with the Medicaid expansion where the federal government paid 100% of the costs for 3 years and thereafter covered 90%. These same states also refused to set up state exchanges, forcing residents onto the federal one. No wonder they have problems – and all just so Republican governors and legislatures wanted to score political points at the expense of their citizens. People may try to say this is just partisan finger-pointing but unfortunately for their view it’s also true. In the states which cooperated and implemented the provisions of the ACA it’s working out wonderfully.

The ACA in its final form was not designed to lower medical costs because that was negotiated out of the bill by Republicans and Pharma lobbyists. But it did, in fact, reduce the rate at which America’s healthcare expenditures increased, and it created significant affordable relief for tens of millions who would otherwise continue without care until forced to show up in the ER with a catastrophic condition. An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure.


All major medical organizations have released statements in complete opposition to BRCA. I would like to quote from the statement from NORD (National Organization for Rare Disorders):

“First, the BCRA will cut hundreds of billions of dollars of Federal funding from the Medicaid program by instituting per capita caps and optional block grants. Medicaid is a critical lifeline to millions of individuals with rare diseases across the United States. … State programs for Medicaid home and community-based services (HCBS) waivers (1915 waivers) may also be jeopardized due to financial constraints.

Second, the BCRA … would phase out Medicaid expansion starting in 2020 and concluding in 2024, likely leaving many individuals with rare diseases without health insurance.

Third, the BCRA does not adhere to several of our principles relating to prohibiting discrimination against individuals with pre-existing conditions. … [The BCRA] would still bring back annual and lifetime limits and limitless out-of-pocket costs by allowing states to amend the Essential Health Benefits (EHB) through section 1332 waivers. These vital protections … would therefore be removed if a state opts out via a 1332 waiver.

Finally, the BCRA does nothing to incentivize healthy individuals to enter the individual market and help stabilize premiums by offsetting the cost of more expensive individuals.”

NORD Statement

I would also like to quote Judith Stein, the Executive Director for the Center for Medicare Advocacy (CMA):

“Never in 40 years of Medicare & Health care advocacy have I witnessed the kind of secrecy, and determination to take away health coverage we are witnessing today. A health care bill would strengthen coverage and delivery programs. This bill gratuitously weakens Medicare, decimates Medicaid, and guts insurance for over 20 million people.”

According to CMA, the BCRA includes:

  • The end of Medicaid expansion: Millions will lose coverage.
  • Medicaid per capita caps: Cuts would actually deepen over time.
  • Repeal of Medicare tax increase: Undermines Medicare’s finances.

CMA Statement

This is a statement I added to a change.org petition calling for a “Medicare for All” program:

“I am currently living only because of Medicare and Medicaid. I have Lou Gehrig’s Disease, and used to be a top-10% wage earner. The disease forced me into bankruptcy slightly before I was even middle-aged. The United States is the wealthiest country in global history, and we have much more than enough taxation right now to pay for guaranteed healthcare. Medicare functions at a much higher efficiency than any other private for-profit insurance, because it doesn’t have a powerful incentive to maximize profit by denying me the services I paid for. Even with “Medicare for all” as a basic level of healthcare, there is still plenty of market left-over for private insurance for things like elective procedures.

It’s time for our public tax dollars to be applied toward services for the public, not for the enrichment of some private corporation. The last year has seen a massive awakening in public attention toward healthcare. If you are not aware of this by now, it’s because you are not paying attention to the voices of your constituents. But we are, and are very much aware of your actions (or lack thereof).”

Please consider signing the petition. It’s not likely to be successful by itself but it will show Congress that there is significant resistance to the GOP plan and that the right move is to actually expand Medicare in order to ensure the right of healthcare for all citizens.

Change.org Petition Link

The BCRA is a hideous piece of legislation that severely jeopardizes the poor, the elderly, and the handicapped like me. It’s basically a tax cut for the hyper-wealthy that is paid for by the suffering and death, yes death, of people coping with ALS and other deadly conditions that were stricken through no fault of their own. It’s a serious threat to my life and the lives of many of my friends. That required me to make this political statement.

Thank you for watching and please vote carefully and diligently in 2018. It can change lives in a major way. In the meantime, please contact your senators immediately and urge them to vote “No” on the BCRA. Until next time, keep breathing easy.

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Cyborg With ALS (podcast)

New Blog Format!

Folks Logo

Audio Podcast Here (192kbps MP3 for download).

YouTube video version here.

Hello to my readers, and now listeners. Welcome to my new blog format where I will post the same text and web hyperlinks as always, but now there will be an audio podcast version on my Youtube channel in the new Podcast List. My electronic avatar, which I specifically created to look like me, will “read” the podcast and a link to it will precede the corresponding post. My channel also has various videos related to ALS and a few personal videos from my past. I will also have a lower-bitrate sound file available as a download link on each blog post. My hope is that this format will make my blog easier for people to enjoy. Everyone now can listen to my posts and then later check out the text version and follow the embedded links to learn more.

This post is to announce my latest interview with a new lifestyle magazine called “Folks”. It’s a publication by PillPack, a full-service pharmacy which separates medication into individual doses. This is pretty handy for people who regularly take medication and may have difficulty with prescription adherence, and institutions like nursing homes and hospitals. The publication was launched about 9 months ago and features people living with various medical conditions, refusing to be defined by that condition. I guess that would include me.

I had the good fortune to be contacted by Josh Andrew. He is one of the writers for Folks and he had heard my recent interview by Reply All, a podcast by Gimlet Media. Our interview was conducted over email. Unlike the podcast, I did not need to also send sound files. The link to the Folks article is in the text version of this blog post. Josh was kind enough to assist me with this podcast by answering a few questions about Folks and how they found me, and how the interview was done. The questions I asked were:

  1. Please describe what Folks Magazine is and what it’s all about.
  2. Please describe how you found me and why my story was interesting to Folks Magazine.
  3. What was the interview by email like?
  4. Have you ever done this before?

His answers are in the podcast.

Thanks for listening and/or viewing. Please leave a comment on this blog post and let me know what you think of the new format.

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Cyborg Is As Cyborg Does – Reply All Interview

World’s First Fully-Functional Cyborg

Reply All Cyborg

I am the world’s first fully-functional cyborg! Need proof? My part in this Reply All podcast starts at 16:35.

This interview took place over about 3 weeks including one live telephone call and approximately 40 questions over email to which I replied both with text and individual MP3 files of the audio of my computer speaking each answer. It was a rather interesting experience and one that would certainly come in handy for any future interviews. Sruthi Pinnamaneni and Rick Kwan did a great job of stitching all of the questions and answers together to make a single coherent interview.

My desire was to demonstrate that life goes on after diagnosis and that there is still PLENTY that someone can still do despite full paralysis and being dependent on a ventilator. Hopefully other more newly-diagnosed PALS listening to the podcast can take a little inspiration to keep living and contributing your individual wonderful gifts to the world. Together, our voices are amplified and we can create the change we want to happen in the world.

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Hope Now for ALS

There has been a lot of recent controversy surrounding the experimental treatment in clinical trials known as GM604. A lot of misinformation has been tossed around on both sides of the issue. I want to beg your attention for a little while to explain what’s really going on.

First, as many of you know, I was the single late-stage PALS who received GM6 in compassionate use. The intent behind this was to get a look at differences in biomarker candidate levels between earlier-stage and late-stage PALS. Any outward physical manifestation of improved condition noticed would be a bonus and, due to my advanced condition, no improvement in condition was expected. Nevertheless, Genervon and I came up with the idea to try to chart improvements in the tongue. The rationale is that since my tongue is only moderately affected, and because the hypoglossal nerve contains one of the shortest motor neurons in the body, any possible improvement would be noticed there first.

Because of my growing cooperative relationship with Genervon dating back to my first blog post on GM6, I was granted the only Expanded Access outside of trial. They were interested in getting a look at GM6 behavior in late-stage PALS and I had proven to them my organizational skills in preparing my own medical surveillance team and in communications by preparing the mechanism for data capture. Even a single Expanded Access Program can be a burden on such a small company not optimized for such work. My knowledge and experience gained over the past few years was of considerable help in filling out and transmitting (and following up on) my own paperwork.

Thousands of single Expanded Access requests would be overly burdensome and even if Genervon enlisted the help of the ALS Emergency Treatment Fund, the maximum number of patients who would be able to participate would be measured in the few hundreds. Not only would patients have to pay for drug but would also have to pay for their own medical surveillance team and at least one hospital visit for the first infusion (this alone represents several thousand dollars). If you are required to give biological samples, the cost tops $10,000.

Genervon shared with me much of the top-level data from the Phase 2 to compare against my own data. Even though the trial population was small, the data were stronger in separation between treatment/placebo cohorts than in any legitimate trial results I had seen before. And GM6 was demonstrated safe over a much larger group spread over three different neurological diseases (including ALS) plus a healthy safety group. For these reasons I suggested to and worked with Genervon on applying for the FDA Accelerated Approval Program in order to get GM6 to all PALS paid for by insurance and Medicare.

And thus began the shitstorm…

Researchers, neurologists, and leaders of certain advocacy organizations who believe in the FDA’s 60 year old regulatory formula – comprised of designing, completing, and analyzing Phase 1, 2, 3 trials over a period of 5-15 years – are failing in their proclaimed mission. They simply have to stop regarding patients as helpless victims willing to eat rat poison if someone said it cured ALS, Genervon as somehow the 19th Century snake oil salesman, and themselves as the White Knight riding to our rescue. The very process of obtaining an experimental drug requires a lot of medical oversight, which we appreciate and rely on. However, patients are intelligent adults whose only desire is to change the status quo of scientific research for the benefit of both the current and future generations of PALS.

The 1992 FDA Accelerated Approval Program (AAP) was designed to meet the needs of patient populations where there is an urgent and unmet need. In 2012, Congress passed and the President signed into law the Food and Drug Administration Safety and Innovation Act (FDASIA), strengthening the agency’s ability to advance public health by equipping the FDA with tools intended to expedite the development and review of innovative new medicines that address certain unmet medical needs. Among the objectives, Title IX expanded the scope of products that qualify for accelerated approval. Specific language in this law states that the FDA is to incorporate novel approaches to the review of surrogate endpoints based on pathophysiologic and pharmacologic evidence in such guidance, especially in instances where the low prevalence of a disease renders the existence or collection of other types of data unlikely or impractical. It is obvious that Congress and the President had in mind diseases just like ALS when passing and signing FDASIA into law, yet the FDA has done very little to incorporate these guidelines.

With Congress now discussing the 21st Century Cures Act, we at Hope Now for ALS believe that we are on the right side of history by insisting that PALS are given opportunities to access new investigational treatments through the FDA’s Accelerated Approval Program which, with its requirement for post-marketing Phase 4 data surveillance to confirm efficacy and safety, will continue to provide invaluable data on new treatments for ALS. As most patients are ineligible for standard clinical trials, this is our only option to contribute to research that will provide the same data at a faster rate among a larger population of patients – providing much needed data on subsets of the patient population. The Phase 4 requirements of Accelerated Approval also have the ability to save billions of dollars in research that is better spent developing more new and better investigational treatments for a myriad of neurological conditions.

I will grant that the biomarker candidates are new and not yet “proven”, but FDA did allow them as endpoints in the Phase 2. They are not brand-new fabrications by Genervon and are backed by a lot of recent research by respected researchers. And they were all quite uniform in response to GM6 while the placebo group all continued in the abnormal direction. In my n=1 case report the biomarker candidates sometimes went in the reverse direction, but ALWAYS TOWARD NORMAL LEVELS. This is a great indication that GM6 promotes neuronal homeostasis – the holy grail for ALS research.

The Phase 2 was indeed also only a very small population, and in previous ALS trials of similar size it was impossible to collect reliable efficacy data in such a small cohort. However, this trial was very different from previous trials. The effect registered was much larger than in previous such trials (especially dexpramipexole) and was backed up by multiple secondary measurements not subject to any placebo effect. The combination of surprisingly-large effect size and objective biological markers sets this aside from previous trials (which also used the ALSFRS almost exclusively). There was an erroneous though well-intentioned attempt to use the released FVC information as evidence of poor trial design. However, the comparison used a very inappropriate analogy population and was built on an assumption based on incorrect data.

I do have serious issues with a point used in arguments against GM6: The lithium debacle. The media reports which came out obviously created a lot of excitement within the patient community. Our first reaction was asking and pleading the research community to quickly follow up with more trials to confirm that study and the response from the research committee was absolute disinterest. Therefore the patient community took it upon themselves to create a verification study, which we did. We did *NOT* merely go out and start using lithium off-label. In fact, it was only after our trial data was being released that the research community decided to do a confirmation study. By then we had already demonstrated that lithium had no effect in ALS and begged the research community to not waste time and millions of dollars.

But again, the research community ignored the patient community.

The Hope Now for ALS movement isn’t for GM6 to skip the regulatory process. It’s to get FDA to use its existing programs and Congressional mandate to provide potentially life-saving treatment to PALS. This is especially important now that truly-effective treatments are very near (including NP001, Neurown, etc.). Caution is obviously warranted but ALS is a race against a clock that doesn’t care. More aggressive strategy is thus required which necessitates a little less caution and a lot more courage.

In summary, the facts are:

  • Genervon asked FDA for Accelerated Approval at the post-Phase 2 meeting where they presented the complete trial data plus the case report for my Compassionate Use project. I know this to be true because I co-wrote the cover letter to the data package and it specifically asked for Accelerated Approval (and it was me who urged Genervon to pursue AAP).
  • The FDA should have responded with specific instructions on how to file. They did not and thus we were all left in a state of confusion. Then FDA took the unusual step of calling on Genervon to publicly release proprietary data. Genervon has no duty to do so and FDA has no authority to make such a request.
  • Genervon has perfectly complied with law and regulation. All they want is to help and they believe GM6 can do that. The data so far looks good (and I can say that, having actually seen it where all others commenting otherwise have not). It’s not a slam-dunk, but it’s positive and safe enough that I think all PALS should have access to it – not just those eligible for clinical trial.
  • The FDA Accelerated Approval Program, in place since 1992 to deal with fatal diseases for which no other treatments exist, is the best way to save lives. It opens access WHILE CLINICAL TRIALS STILL CONTINUE. It’s used for cancer and other diseases with less-severe prognosis. Why not ALS?
  • GM6 has a perfect safety record in over 50 patients across 3 separate neurological conditions plus a healthy initial safety cohort.
  • This is about patients deciding for themselves what risk to take in treatment. This is NOT about a company trying to avoid the clinical trial process or enrich itself on patients desperation. The AAP is an existing program which gives patients access to potentially life-saving treatment while collecting the valuable efficacy data.
  • Contrast Genervon’s completely legal and transparent actions to other companies marketing unproven products such as lunasin and aimspro directly to patients using email. Those companies use slick pitches with “proof” based purely on non-accepted metrics and anecdotes.
  • The movement behind GM6 is entirely grassroots.

The above are facts. All of the “expert opinion” going around is just biased speculation.

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Condition Green

As many of you might already know, I was the late-stage PALS mentioned in the recent Genervon press release. I got interested in this drug some time ago, did some research on it and wrote a blog post about it. I had contacted the company, Genervon, to get information for my post. Thereafter, a dialogue was maintained regarding clinical trial status and future development plans. Being that I am a late stage PALS and still extremely active in awareness, advocacy, and science, they agreed to my request for compassionate use. It was another 9 months going through the process of authorization (mostly because my local hospital had never done anything like this before and together we created a new protocol).

During that time the Phase 2A results came out and I was given access to some of the data. Those, combined with my own experience, gave me the satisfaction that this drug was safe and quite likely effective. I share the concerns about trial size, but like all PALS am concerned for the time required to go through the usual phases of clinical trials. The clinical trial program actually has four parts:

  • Phase 1 – single dose usually in healthy subjects for gauging safety
  • Phase 2 – use in actual patients looking at safety and initial efficacy
  • Phase 3 – larger patient population with different doses, efficacy and SAEs
  • Phase 4 – market surveillance for adverse events

Not only does it take time to fully enroll and execute a large clinical trial but it takes even more time to secure the funding necessary to begin each phase. This is especially true in this current era of venture capital avoiding biotech investment.

I have helped launch other initiatives to get PALS access to experimental treatments. It is critical that patients get more than one or perhaps two chances at early access to treatment while they are newly diagnosed. Drugs that are possibly effective must be made broadly available to patients who are facing otherwise-certain death. Based on the safety and the indication of efficacy in GM6 (mainly borne of my personal experience), I got behind the effort to seek what FDA calls Accelerated Approval so that many more PALS can try it and see where it takes us. Accelerated Approval requires full data surveillance for efficacy, not just serious adverse events (SAEs). The efficacy data determines whether final approval is made. Basically, Accelerated Approval is like a Phase 3 where patients/insurance pay for participation. I believe all PALS would gladly participate in such a program.

If the wider data don’t support the continued use of GM6 I will be the first to admit it. But right now I believe GM6 has the capability to effectively treat ALS in a way no previous drug ever has. And I want to get that opportunity as quickly as possible to as many PALS as possible.

After publishing the press release and posting it on social media and online forums, another PALS started a petition to the FDA to demonstrate the support in the ALS Community for this Accelerated Approval. I would like to urge all who are concerned about ALS – PALS/CALS/Friends – to sign this petition and share it among your social circles. At that link you can sign the petition and post comments to be included with your name. You can also find links to email Senators who oversee FDA and proposed text for those messages.

It is imperative that the comments left on the petition signatures be respectful. FDA isn’t the enemy. They really would like nothing better than to approve a treatment for ALS but need the data to support it. I think we have the data because even though the population was small, the slope of decline as measured by the ALSFRS-R was reduced significantly during the short treatment window. Also, certain biomarker candidates were tracked and correlated with progression. Nevertheless, FDA has to be very careful with the precedent it sets so we as patients must be partners with them in these decisions.

My own experience with GM6 has been positive. The worst part of the entire project was getting the PICC line and the lumbar punctures for CSF samples to make biomarker measurements. I experienced absolutely no adverse events related to the drug. Insofar as benefits, I must admit that the small gains in function noted in the press release are most likely due to surviving neurons branching out new axon terminals to cover the neuromuscular junctions (NMJs) abandoned by the dying motor neurons affected by ALS. GM6 will NOT regrow dead motor neurons. However, it does induce healing in injured ones. In my case, I probably don’t have many injured motor neurons – most of mine are gone. But people who are more recently diagnosed have a higher chance of regaining some lost function in addition to stopping progression.

Based on the information I have seen and my own positive experience, along with the considerable (at best) delay in commencing a larger Phase 2 or 3 trial, I think GM6 deserves Accelerated Approval. I also think this could set a beneficial precedent for future drugs which show similar safety and efficacy signals in early trials. Hence my hope for GM6 getting into the larger population of PALS.

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IceBucket The Blue Sky

The #ALSIceBucketChallenge has been nothing short of a miracle for patients and researchers. Internet memes are rather capricious, having a nearly random hit/miss ratio. That this became so huge is a stroke of incredible luck. The awareness, and resulting increase in donations, has been a huge windfall. This surge couldn’t have come at a better time as researchers now have exquisite investigational tools not available even 5 years ago.

There is then the begged question, “Why did it take a patient and a tractor trailer full of luck to bring awareness to the public?” For decades there have been organizations claiming to represent ALS patients. Yet never has there been a sustained national awareness project executed. Patients were left largely on their own to create awareness. This is a question to which we as patients should demand an answer.

Nevertheless, the windfall is upon us. I believe that this boost in funding should be used to create a critical mass of awareness and outreach. As stated, Internet memes are capricious and subject to fading from the public memory with all the speed and ferocity with which it entered. This is the perfect time to keep the message sustained in the public view. Certainly the money to do so is now available.

Another question the ALS patient community should be asking is how much of the massively increased donations are going to be actually used for research, and in what programs. Some donations are going directly to research facilities but the bulk of them are not. Is that bulk to be hoarded and doled out in tiny slices and without focus to a wide variety of basic research projects, never giving any sufficient amounts to fully complete the work? Or will a significant effort be launched which will fund focused work on high-value pathways, including helping fund clinical trials in humans (there are a few promising treatments languishing for lack of funding to pay clinics to conduct Phase 2-3 trials).

This is the time for organizations representing the ALS patient community to step up. The shelf-life of popular public awareness is notoriously short. We need to take this opportunity to create a program of sustained awareness and lobbying for research funding, along with a focused research effort encompassing basic research through to human trials. It is also the time for all research and advocacy organizations to come together as a united front in order to make ALS nothing more than an unpleasant memory.

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PSAwesome

On Monday of last week, this excellent PSA was released by Team Gleason. It was shown on the big screens inside the Superdome but needs to be shown repeatedly on major network television (ie ABC/CBS/NBC). Please watch, share with friends, and send to your local network television stations. This is the kind of message that needs to get in front of the eyeballs of America. This is the celebrity action we have been asking for. Now let’s do our part in getting it out there.

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Response-able

I was recently alerted to a blog called Science-Based Medicine which had a post that was rather critical of me. The post was written by David Gorski, a managing editor of Science-Based Medicine. If you read the post, you can probably understand why I took a little umbrage to Dr. Gorski’s characterization of my efforts. Below is my response to him, shared here for my readers’ convenience.

“I find your attempts to discredit me by dissembling most curious for a chap claiming to champion honest science. First of all, the multiple conflations between NP001, my personal project, and MMS are deliberately misleading. The only relationship between the three is that they contain some amount of sodium chlorite. MMS is a rather high concentration that is broken down to chlorine dioxide by the citric acid with which it is mixed. NP001 is a very low concentration of sodium chlorite delivered intravenously. My oral delivery is the same concentration as NP001, with at best about 30% delivery of NaClO2 to the blood after gut passage (according to FDA publications on animal exposure). My project (https://sites.google.com/site/alschlorite/) was intended more as an open-label experiment for people who didn’t qualify for the Phase 2 trial and in the absence of an Expanded Access Program (which some of us are working on for during the Phase 3).
NP001 and its cousin WF10 have excellent safety and tolerability in multiple studies and the case for sodium chlorite having the desired immune modulation is extensively covered in PubMed despite your claims to the contrary (please see http://www.ericvalor.org/?p=86 for an easy guide through a few of the publications by Dr. Michael McGrath, the inventor). And despite your casting doubt as to the integrity of Neuraltus by pointing at a lack of publication in PubMed, the record on clinicaltrials.gov clearly shows that Neuraltus has satisfied thus far all FDA requirements to move forward in the regulatory process for NP001 and another candidate drug (http://www.clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/results?term=neuraltus). Further, I trust the results published on Patients Like Me done by my friend known online as Persevering (http://www.ericvalor.org/?p=42). We have good reason to believe that our correlation between side-effects and live drug is accurate. I won’t reveal that right now because NP001 still has trials to go and I don’t want to pollute the subject pool.
I didn’t just guess about NP001 and run to buy a bottle of MMS like you insinuate here. I did a careful review of literature by Dr. McGrath, including email with Dr. McGrath himself. I had other sources of information which explicitly stated that sodium chlorite indeed was the active ingredient in NP001. I then worked with a chemist with years of experience using sodium chlorite in the water purification industry to examine feasability and safety. Congratulations on your own discovery, but you could have emailed me for documentation (I am quite easy to Google).
The lithium project (in which I participated) was not a collection of anecdotes but rather a self-reported trial using the standard measuring tool of the time – the ALS Functional Rating Scale or ALSFSR. This is the same questionnaire used in neurological clinics. Karen Felzer did a fantastic job analyzing the data. Unfortunately the data showed futility, like the official trials that followed ours.
The lithium project (http://alslithium.atspace.com) was organized because all other ALS organizations expressed no interest in testing the fantastic report making headlines. We patients therefore took it upon ourselves to make an initial, admittedly unofficial, trial to test the report. We knew that the results would not be as reliable as a real clinical trial, but our results would be enough to carry on further to a real clinical trial if the findings in the study paper were real. Shamed by our effort, other organizations hastily constructed trials which proved our findings. Even years later, organizations were burning precious money doing real trials when they could have looked at our results and not wasted precious time which could have been spent on other studies.
My reports are not a figment of my imagination as you suggest. Go to my site listed above and look at the video evidence I have posted. My doctors have also physically seen the improvements, much to their surprise. Although I don’t make ANY claim of definitive evidence, I do take my effort quite seriously and soberly.
The real story here, which you ignore or dismiss, is patient empowerment. For too long have we been isolated and told to just wait to die. We can use technology now to organize and, more importantly, mobilize. We now can and will take action to promote OUR agenda, not the feeble selfish agenda of certain advocacy organizations which do very little beside provide employment for their directors.
We are trained in highly-skilled technology trades. We might not be doctors, but we are engineers trained to research and resolve highly complex problems. We are capable of learning and comprehending complicated concepts. We understand the limits of our abilities and, further, that without our efforts the pace of the fight against disease is much too slow for people living today. And we have no delusion that anything we are doing is intended to replace clinical trials. Rather we intend to augment and push forward the actual science.
I will let Jamie Heywood respond further on behalf of PLM.
– Eric N. Valor”

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All Alone

It’s the middle of ALS Awareness Month. Individuals have been doing an excellent job of pushing awareness in their local circles. This includes pet groomers holding awareness and fundraising events,

Bed&Biscuits-ALSA

people putting up extensive Pinterest boards,

ALS can affect everyone

and people creating their own video PSAs

PSA

in an attempt to reach out to and educate others who aren’t already personally affected by ALS.
I would like to call special attention to my friends at Bed & Biscuits who are doing a local event at their store. Owner Laurie Chadwick and husband moved to Oregon to care for their son Rob after he was diagnosed with ALS. She keeps her business going and does the event mentioned above a few times a year. This is a truly remarkable effort and I hope my readers in the area would take their furry (non-human) children down for a nail trimming to support this event.
There is a lot of action happening by PALS, CALS, and friends. There are even concerned corporate entities trying to make a difference. What is noticeably absent is a national effort by a certain representative organization. This multi-million dollar annual budget organization went to the trouble of creating a rather good PSA featuring Jason Alexander (of “Seinfeld” and other famous work). However, instead of pushing it aggressively on national television, the organization asks those it represents to send around a link via email and social media. This half-baked distribution strategy is clearly unacceptable and example of how the organization works in every area of its operations. This organization can be better, should be better, and we should demand that it be better.
It’s National ALS Awareness Month. Crippled and dying people and their families are exerting considerable energy trying to help themselves. Organizations that collect millions of dollars in donations (approximately half of it from the estimated 30,000 PALS alive during any given year) should be doing more to educate the general public than their individual constituents.

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Under Press-Sure

Over the past two weeks ALS has gotten some much-needed national coverage, first from the Wall Street Journal followed shortly by ABC News. I also just completed the first round of questions for an article due to appear in July in the-scientist.com. More opportunities seem to be materializing and I will do my best to keep the momentum going to keep the message of ALS in front of the public. I would like to call upon everyone to contact their local press, mention the WSJ and ABC News articles, and tell them YOUR stories. If you think it would help to mention a relationship to me, do so and I will back you.

There were a few points in the articles that I wanted to clarify:

  • I did not design the computer I use. It is a TabletKiosk Sahara Slate PC i440T with a Point Grey Flea-2 CCD camera with an infrared light and lense. The system uses the ERICA software made by Eye Response Technologies (since purchased by DynaVox). The only part of the computer I modified was my work environment and I installed certain programs and utilities which I use. I did help design the overhead mount which slides along the overhead track I use for my lift.
  • NP001 is indeed sodium chlorite, but when ingested orally the acid in the stomach breaks down most of it. The most optimistic data I have seen (based on rats exposed to it in drinking water) is a maximum 30% reaching the bloodstream. I would expect that to be less, and to be variable, in most people.
  • Because NP001 is already in clinical trial, I arranged the project more as an “early access” model with data-keeping as secondary.
  • I have three criteria for any such projects:
    • drug must be relatively safe
    • drug must be inexpensive
    • drug must be legal to obtain

It’s very important to me that I don’t recklessly put other PALS in physical, financial, or legal jeopardy with any project. My intention is to help not harm. We all already have enough problems to deal with.