Tag Archives: SOD1

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Guest Blog: Me!

SRG Research News – First A Little Background

As most of you know, I started SciOpen Research Group as a way for me to be able to fire actual bullets in the battle against ALS (well, actually metaphorical, but you get the idea). Our first project failed to extend life in the classic ALS mouse model so we retained the money raised to conduct the planned second part of that experiment. We had another project already in the research pipeline waiting to take the next step in development. For two years SRG was working on creating a novel molecule which would treat the desired pathway without becoming toxic like the reference molecule does at therapeutic doses. Suddenly we had the opportunity to collaborate with researchers already investigating the same pathway, albeit in different conditions (watch the video announcement), with their own library of candidate molecules.

Our collaboration’s first phase is to create a novel transgenic mouse species which represents a 100% drug efficacy in order to be a proof of concept. The project should run through the last half of 2016. As you will see below, a study was recently published which shows that SRG is definitely onto something. Our target protein is significantly elevated in human patients, and that targeting it brings positive results. The study is great indirect support of our project’s goal.

And now, the guest blog featuring myself!

Good News For Our Latest Project!

A recent report published in Science magazine strongly suggests that SciOpen Research Group is onto something with its currently ongoing study of necroptosis in ALS. Necroptosis is a “cousin” of apoptosis. In contrast to apoptosis, which happens regularly in the body, necroptosis is a form of programmed cell death which happens under inflammatory conditions and in which the components of the dead cell spill into the extracellular space. The spilling of the cellular components trigger a response in which immune cells are recruited to the area. Necroptosis is known to be a driver of both genetic ALS and sporadic ALS.

The subject study is not a direct support, in that it was looking at how the optineurin protein contributes to ALS. However, the results showed significant increase of the MLKL protein in human patients and that elimination of the RIPK3 protein or inhibition of RIPK1 had modest but nevertheless positive effects on survival of the SOD1 mice (along with positive biological evidence). This suggests that SRG is on the right track with its MLKL study. We believe that acting on MLKL will have a stronger effect without disrupting other cellular functions which depend on RIPK3 and/or RIPK31 (MLKL is involved only in necroptosis).

This study is YOUR study. It would not be position without your support. SciOpen Research Group is the world’s first fully functional “guerilla biotech”. We function only with your support and study pathways other research organizations either miss or ignore. And we can do it for much less because we are purely volunteer and have no overhead. 100% of your donations go directly to research. To support us you can make a tax-deductible donation (USA residents only) by going to our Donations page, purchase some SRG Gear, and/or go shopping on Amazon Smile and name SciOpen Research Group as your charity of choice (we are a registered and approved nonprofit under IRS 501c3). We work on ALS for you, the ALS Community, because we are part of the ALS Community. Help us continue our novel research into eradicating ALS.

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Guest Blog: Me!

Good News For Our Latest Project!

A recent report published in Science magazine strongly suggests that SciOpen Research Group is onto something with its currently ongoing study of necroptosis in ALS. Necroptosis is a “cousin” of apoptosis. In contrast to apoptosis, which happens regularly in the body, necroptosis is a form of programmed cell death which happens under inflammatory conditions and in which the components of the dead cell spill into the extracellular space. The spilling of the cellular components trigger a response in which immune cells are recruited to the area. Necroptosis is known to be a driver of both genetic ALS and sporadic ALS.

The subject study is not a direct support, in that it was looking at how the optineurin protein contributes to ALS. However, the results showed significant increase of the MLKL protein in human patients and that elimination of the RIPK3 protein or inhibition of RIPK1 had modest but nevertheless positive effects on survival of the SOD1 mice (along with positive biological evidence). This suggests that SRG is on the right track with its MLKL study. We believe that acting on MLKL will have a stronger effect without disrupting other cellular functions which depend on RIPK3 and/or RIPK31 (MLKL is involved only in necroptosis).

This study is YOUR study. It would not be position without your support. SciOpen Research Group is the world’s first fully functional “guerilla biotech”. We function only with your support and study pathways other research organizations either miss or ignore. And we can do it for much less because we are purely volunteer and have no overhead. 100% of your donations go directly to research. To support us you can make a tax-deductible donation (USA residents only) by going to our Donations page, purchase some SRG Gear, and/or go shopping on Amazon Smile and name SciOpen Research Group as your charity of choice (we are a registered and approved nonprofit under IRS 501c3). We work on ALS for you, the ALS Community, because we are part of the ALS Community. Help us continue our novel research into eradicating ALS.

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Of Mice And Me

As many of my readers know, about two years ago I came across a study investigating a novel molecule for the treatment of Alzheimer’s. The molecule, J147, is a synthetic derivative of curcumin. Curcumin and other similar molecules have long been under study for neurodegenerative diseases. Unfortunately curcuminoids have rather poor bioavailability, meaning they are quickly excreted from the body and require high amounts to have a therapeutic value. Like curcumin, J147 is “orally available” (meaning it is introduced to the body by eating it) but is more than 100X as potent. This means a much smaller quantity is necessary for therapeutic effect. So far, we haven’t found a toxic dose of J147. Work on toxicity is ongoing.

In the Alzheimer’s study J147 had remarkable results in that model. The pathways acted upon were quite relevant to ALS. These include potent antioxidant effects, significant reduction of microglia activation and migration, and reduction of heat-shock protein expression which indicates a shift back toward cellular homeostasis. More recent data (unpublished) indicates an effect in reducing astrocyte activation, which is sufficient to rapidly kill even healthy motor neurons.

Unfortunately, because J147 is pleiotropic, pharmaceutical companies weren’t interested. The current research paradigm is to focus on single molecular targets. For diseases with a single mechanisms, that’s a fine method of attack. But ALS has quite a few things going on simultaneously. All prior single-target treatments have failed and the current growing opinion is that successful treatment would require a cocktail of drugs. Better to have a single pleiotropic substance than a mixture of chemicals with uncertain interactions.

In April, 2013, I created SciOpen Research Group in order to have an entity capable of negotiating research and licensing of novel molecules with the promise of treatment of ALS. J147 is our first project. In the early summer of 2013, SRG applied to Prize4Life for access to their colony of G93A transgenic research mice at Jackson Laboratories. Our research proposal for J147 was accepted and we were given granted sufficient animal numbers to properly conduct our study. We received the mice and started the experiment at the end of January.

We are very excited to have commenced our first research program and demonstrate that guerrilla biotechs can perform quality science. To that end, we created a crowdfunding campaign on Indiegogo to obtain funding for the next step of the experiment – microscopic tissue examination. This will tell us exactly what J147 did to help the motor neurons in the mice.

Please donate if you can. All donations are tax-deductible. If you cannot donate please spread word about SRG and our need for funding this new and exciting research.

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Carpe Fragments

In the developing embryo, motor neurons develop and nearly half preferentially die prior to birth (Henderson, et al., 1997, “Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF/SF) is a muscle-derived survival factor for a subpopulation of embryonic motoneurons”). As shown in Forger, et al., 2001 (“Blockade of Endogenous Neurotrophic Factors Prevents the Androgenic Rescue of Rat Spinal Motoneurons”), loss of muscular targets also leads to post-natal motor neuron degeneration. Post-natal mice engineered to have degenerated muscle spindles exhibit ataxia and resting tremors, indicating a decrease in proprioception due to loss of sensory-motor synapses (Frank, et al., 2002, “Muscle Spindle-Derived Neurotrophin 3 Regulates Synaptic Connectivity between Muscle Sensory and Motor Neurons”).

One interesting factor seems to suggest a link with testosterone in preserving motor neurons, which could be a possible explanation for the statistically higher numbers of men affected in middle-age or above, and that of women in post-menopause, when hormone levels experience radical shift. Indeed, Cilliary Neurotrophic Factor, a potent motor neuron trophic factor, is regulated by gonadal hormones (Forger, et al., 1998, “Ciliary Neurotrophic Factor Receptor in Spinal Motoneurons is Regulated by Gonadal Hormones”).

Leaving aside the question of hormone levels, there is much evidence that muscle-derived neurotrophic factors are necessary for the health and survival of the motor neurons. One in particular, Motoneuronotrophic Factor 1 (MNTF1), appears essential to this critical process. Experiments in Wobbler mice show that motor neuron disease increases as MNTF1 levels decrease (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10453487). MNTF1 was first described in the early 90s, and the human form was successfully cloned as an artificial protein. Various fragments were extracted and shown to have neurotrophic effect.

Two overlapping domains of a 33 amino acid fragment of MNTF1, dubbed the Fred and Wilma domains, are sufficient to stimulate motor neuroprotection in a manner similar to the whole 33 amino acid MNTF1 fragment. The Fred domain is sufficient to direct selective reinnervation of muscle targets by motor neurons in vivo in a manner similar to the 33 amino acid MNTF1 fragment. A recombinant protein containing the Fred domain maintained motoneuron viability, increased neurite outgrowth, reduced motoneuron cell death/apoptosis and supported the growth and spreading of motoneurons into giant, active neurons with extended growth cone-containing axons.

For those curious about the amino acids in each domain, please refer to the image below:

Genervon has patented these fragments and is using them in a Phase 2-A clinical trial in ALS.

From the above it is quite possible that at least some forms of ALS are caused by a sort of a muscular dystrophy (not to be confused with the distinct condition by that name). It therefore stands to reason that there is reason for hope that some will benefit. The standard caveat of basic and preclinical research often not translating to human trials obviously applies. However, we are entering an exciting time where extremely potent shots are being taken at more fundamental aspects of ALS. One or a combination seem likely to have the effect we have been waiting for.

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Old Tricks

Something very intriguing came in over the weekend from PLoSONE. It was a study comparing neuromuscular junctions between age and ALS. It turns out that the same muscles susceptible to denervation in ALS are likewise susceptible to denervation with age. Autonomic muscles (those that act without your conscious input) and muscles innervated directly from the brain (eg your eyes and certain facial muscles) are extraordinarily resistant to age- and ALS-related denervation. Something that struck me was the finding that TDP43 was mislocalized in aged motor neurons very similarly to ALS motor neurons. TDP43 is normally found in the nucleus but in ALS it is found in the cytoplasm where it is cleaved by caspases and a 25 kilodalton fragment aggregates in a form that apparently gains a toxic function.

TDP43 mislocalization has also been found by the symptomatic phase in the SOD1 mouse model (although earlier and more recent reports are somewhat contradictory on this point). Another protein found upregulated in the SOD1 mouse is CRMP4a, a subprotien of the CRMP family. CRMP4 is normally involved in learning, neurite outgrowth, and building functional circuitry within the brain. However, the Duplan, et al., 2010 study referenced above found upregulation or overexpression of CRMP4a is deadly specific to motor neurons. In the subject study of this post, Valdez, et al., 2012, CRMP4a was also found upregulated in the same types of motor neurons of normally-aged mice as those which degenerate in ALS mice. CRMPs are known to change due to age.

Inflammation is present in all neurodegenerative diseases. One of the primary drivers of ALS is thought to be neuroinflammation. Multiple animal models of ALS, including data in humans, show neuroinflammation. As the subject study shows, TDP43 and CRMP4 is upregulated in both aging and ALS. Taking one step further, aging and ALS have another thing in common: Inflammation.